Work / Architecture
ARCHIFEST PAVILION

The Reclaiming Connectivity pavilion was originally inspired by OWIU Design Studio Founding Partner Amanda Gunawan’s photographs on abstraction of natural landscape. The Pavilion’s design uses photography print on Light Emitting Surfaces (LES) glass to capture the subtle details of water as an attempt to distort its original way of being perceived. Similarly, the Pavilion’s concept of Reclaiming Connectivity is a relook at what is current, and aims to inspire reflections on humanity’s innate need for connection, juxtaposed against the current reality of social distancing in public spaces. The LES glass is kindly sponsored by SG-Glass and Kingboard (FoGang) Specialty Resins.

OWIU Design Team: Joel Wong, Amanda Gunawan, Claudia Wainer, Eduardo Cortazar

The theme of Archifest 2020 - “Architecture Saving OUR World,” examines new ideas and responsible designs that benefit our ecology and humanity – climate change, public health, social equity and cultural continuity and the spirit of ‘creative activism’ within the profession. Singapore Archifest 2020 seeks to bring forth this spirit and demonstrate how architecture has the power to impact and ultimately save our world. 

The ‘Reclaiming Connectivity’ pavilion re-examines public space within the reality of the COVID-19 pandemic world and is inspired by the golden rule “open plan” concept of Le Corbusier. It offers an alternative to isolation, by creating private areas of public space. Incorporating LES technology, the space enables an illuminated atmosphere of calm with onedirectional circulation to ensure safety protocols of social distancing and sanitizing. The porous glass design is composed of patented-technology building material was ideated to virtually display the work of artists and photographers.

The non-invasive walls provide a translucent frame of reference and a sense of being connected to the world, while still ensuring privacy and social distance. The pavilion will be designed using a part-to-whole method that ensures complete offsite modular prefabrication, transportability and complete on-site construction within 48 hours. Simply assembled, the pavilion structure is composed of 99% sustainable FSC-certified timber and can be transported in one standard container.

The awarding jury explains that the ‘Reclaiming Connectivity’ pavilion by ADDP Architects in collaboration with OWIU Design Studio, “stands out from the other entries as it responds to the 2020 Singapore Architect’s theme in a multi-layered manner, yet with a simple and subtle design, offering potential for much deeper discussions for the festival. The design emphasizes public space as an innate human need for connectivity and therefore challenges the current reaction of cultivating privacy through social distancing.” 

The Reclaiming Connectivity pavilion was originally inspired by OWIU Design Studio Founding Partner Amanda Gunawan’s photographs on abstraction of natural landscape. The Pavilion’s design uses photography print on Light Emitting Surfaces (LES) glass to capture the subtle details of water as an attempt to distort its original way of being perceived. Similarly, the Pavilion’s concept of Reclaiming Connectivity is a relook at what is current, and aims to inspire reflections on humanity’s innate need for connection, juxtaposed against the current reality of social distancing in public spaces. The LES glass is kindly sponsored by SG-Glass and Kingboard (FoGang) Specialty Resins.

As part of the festival’s hybrid edition, the highly-anticipated Pavilion will also be presented in an unprecedented format - virtually. Embracing their roles as “form-makers”, ADDP Architects and OWIU Design Studio will be showcasing their imagination by creating the ideal form and structure of the Pavilion online, in the absence of any economic or environmental restrictions. Festival goers can expect to explore a virtual Pavilion that allows them to examine the structure through an interactive 3-D tour that offers up 360 degree views, right from the comfort of home.



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