Work / Architecture
MORI CONCEPT

Mori is a modular and easily buildable product designed to encourage creativity, movement and social interaction amongst society.

"MORI" 森 is a logographic Japanese character that means "forest", made up by three components of the wood "moku" 木 character . The wood character has a human "jin" 人 character inlaid within, and thus the character MORI can be understood as a collective of woods but could also infers to an assembly of people. MORI explores human interactions as people come together to build and create. 


On its own, ki/moku means wood, a strong, versatile and important material. Arguably, a requisite in building. Combined, it forms mori, that means forest, a vital ecosystem whose strengths depend on the synergy and collaboration between numerous living things. The more effective the collaboration between habitats, the more powerful the forest becomes. In the word mori, 3 of the characters hito/jin are embedded, only visible to the acute observer. There’s a symbolic meaning that emphasizes the importance of collaboration between human beings in a society in order to create a harmonious, working forest/ecosystem. The dissection of the name of the product, Mori, is so apt in describing what the goals, principles and significance behind this product.

Like moku, the single module displays adaptability, structural integrity and aesthetic appeal. It is at its most potent, however, when combined with more of its kind, creating functional and unique components. The module is simple. It comprises of four (1.5”x18”) timber blocks, joint together by ¼” dowels. Nestled between the blocks are connector pieces (3/8”x26”) angled at 45-degrees for directional range, enabling the module to join laterally and diagonally to produce multiple product possibilities, pushing the creative boundaries of users.


Mori provides the foundation to teach individuals how to design and build, or rather is simply luring the existing but currently suppressed ability to create and build in individuals by providing them fundamental skills, a starting point for an idea and the confidence to do it. The beauty of the product, really, is passing the baton to society to design. Our resourceful society has proven multiple times, in history, that as long as it is taught the skills to fish, it will come up with inventive and novel ways of doing it, surprising everybody in the process. It is interesting the limitless possibilities that can ensue from the module once it intersects with the inevitable contemporary societal forces of enterprise and creativity. Mori also recognizes the ability of design to break social barriers of society. Through collaborative creating and building, there is a recognition and understanding in this process that humans are humans. Design never discriminates. Design is targeted for a universal audience. A universality that acknowledges that an ideal society is not about creating homogeneity among humans, but rather bringing together a group of individuals that is working tangentially towards the same goal.